Nursing History in Houston and Surrounding Areas

Below are the topics that will be covered in the documentary.

About the Series

This important project celebrates the rich history of Nursing over the last 120 years in Houston and the Gulf Coast Region.  The “Faces of Nursing” series will be distributed within nursing associations and groups, as well as, through social media and YouTube Podcasts. 

SPONSOR THE FEATURE

Episode 1: Early History


Contributions
:
TMC Historic Library
Memorial Hermann
UTMB


Interviews
:
Patricia Starck, DNS, RN, FAAN
Dean Emerita, UT Health Science

Joyce Alt, RN, MS
MD Anderson Cancer Center

Tina Cuellar, RN, PhD, PMHCNS-BC
Clinical Adjunct FM, University of St. Thomas

Dr. Pamela Greene
Texas A&M Corpus Christi


Photo: UTMB Galveston 1897
Credit: Texas Board of Nursing

Early History

With today’s modern healthcare, it is hard to imagine a world without nurses caring for our medical needs and supporting the physicians who treat us.  Most people recognize that the nursing profession began with the work of Florence Nightingale, an upper class British woman who captured the public imagination when she led a group of female nurses to the Crimea in October of 1854 to deliver nursing service toBritish soldiers.  Amazingly, just twelve years after Florence Nightingale began her work in Britain, the state of Texas would birth a nursing movement that would spark the beginning of one of the greatest medical communities in the United States. Exploring early roots in Galveston and the surrounding coastal region, “Faces of Nursing, Houston” takes the audience on an exciting journey of the rich history of nursing and how it has developed over the 20th and 21st Centuries.

Program Objectives: 
Provide a historical overview of the first nursing educational programs of education and the progression of politics, policies, and influences on the nursing schools, colleges and curriculum to guide nursing care. Featured components will look at early practices, facilities, and people that would help expand care to neighboring communities and how that would garnish national support to provide care for a diverse population.

Nurse Profession: RN, MSN, MBA


Episode 2: Community Health and Home Care


Contributors:

TNA District 9
Visiting Nurse Association in Houston
ACP Home Health
 


Interviews:


Arlita Pang, BSN, RN
ACP Health Care Resource

Funke Omo-Osagie, RN, MScN, ER
Elseviers

Rosemary Pine, PhD, RN
Karee Carter
Bets Anderson
UTMB


For Review of all interviews


Photo: Staff of the OBVNA 1962
Credit: Oyster Bay Historical Society

Community Health and Home Care

If you’ve ever received medical treatment, you’ve met a nurse. These healthcare specialists work day and night to provide direct care to patients. Their job duties and opportunities vary, depending on the type of nurse they are.  Today, there are more than 4 million jobs in 5 nurse occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Moreover, employment of nurses is projected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations through 2028. While 56% of nurses work in the hospital setting, the remainder of nurses care for patients outside the hospital in the community and home care settings.  “Faces of Nursing, Houston”shows the vital role nurses play today in keeping our communities safe and well inside the walls of our hospitals, as well as, in the communities and homes where we live.  

Program Objectives:
Communicate the progression of home care in early stages to the current role of nurses in home care services. Private Duty Nursing, a precursor to home health care of 21st century; District 9 maintenance of Private Duty registry and rules that included ethical rules of behavior, payment and fees; role of private duty nurse with patient, family, and physician. Explore community and public health services, entrepreneurs, insurance providers, and current tele-health innovations led and provided by nurses in Houston and surrounding areas.

Nurse Profession: RN, LVN, LPN, CNA, PT

Episode 3: Military


Contributions:
Michael E. DeBakey VA


Interviews:

Marylyn Harris, RN, MSN, MBA
Pam Green
Jennifer Myles
Karen Alexander
Shatoi King
Major Christopher J. Mazza CRNA, MSN
Assistant Chief CRNA Ellington Field


Photo: Army Nurses 1945
Credit: Angels of Bataan Soldiers Magazine

Military

“Faces of Nursing, Houston” is proud to honor the brave men and women who serve as nurses in our military and Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Military nurses serve in most major branches of the military, including the Army, Navy, and Air Force. They provide direct patient care for service members and their families, perform medical duties for wounded soldiers, and may pursue the same areas of practice specialization that nurses in civilian roles would. Military nurses are among the most respected professionals in their field.  In this episode we will take a look at the impact our military nurses have had throughout Houston and the surrounding region over the span of time and world events.

Program Objectives:
This episode will highlight interviews from nurses who have served in war times and also those who used their experiences to help provide nursing protocols and other activities during war times. Provide explanations of different services in the Department of Defense, VAMCs and the different roles and positions that facilitate those services. Remembering their legacy while forging ahead serving others as active duty, reserve, and civilian nurses.

Nurse Profession: RN, LVN, LPN

Episode 4: Diversity


Contributions:
Prairie View A&M University
Black Nurses Association of  Galveston


Interviews:

Sandra Chaveleh – South America
Funke Omo-Osagie – Nigeria
Tina Cuella – African American
Marylyn Harris – African American
Arlia Pang – immigration from Phillippines
Pam Windle – immigration from Philippines
Mary Abraham - immigration from India
LanAnh Nguyen – immigration from Vietnam
Vivianee Watts


Photo: A group of pupil nurses who have just qualified as state enrolled nurses (SENs) in the 1950s
Credit: Royal College of Nursing, P/18/02/85/13

Diversity

“Faces of Nursing, Houston” explores how people of color entered the profession of Nursing and the major events that shaped this movement.  Prairie View A&M University, the first state supported College in Texas for African Americans, had its beginnings in 1876 during the Reconstruction Period after the Civil War. With property purchased from the Alta Vista Plantation, Confederate President Jefferson Davis recommended Mr. Thomas S. Gathright and Mr. L.W. Minor from Mississippi to serve as Principal and the school began their studies on March 11, 1878. Riverside General Hospital was constructed in 1925 and became one of the greatest influences for change.  The Houston Negro Hospital Nursing School, which was established soon after the Hospital was built, was the first such educational institution for the training of Black nurses in the City of Houston.  Over the progression of time and through the Civil Rights Movements, healthcare across the nation and in the gulf region would embrace diversity as a vital component of meeting the needs of patients of all color.

When the Exchange Visitor Program was created in 1948 to bring people from other countries to the U.S., during the Cold War and exposing foreigners to U.S. democracy, Filipinos nurses already had an established path to the States. In fact, Filipino nursing in America had roots in the 1898 colonization of the Philippines. Thousands of capable nurses are recruited from other countries including but not limited to South Korea, India, Jamaica, Nigeria, Puerto Rico, Kenya, Nepal, and Canada. The above photo is a good example of the diversity of nursing being recruited from around the world.

Program Objectives:
Explore early the history of political and economic special interest groups were able to aggressively use the Federal Government to establish public policy, in an attempt to “alter or reshape the cultural milieu of the vanquished southern states”. This episode will include interviews with diverse backgrounds to highlight the challenges and victories of nationalities and genders to include the evolution of men nurses in the workplace along with women's professional pursuits in medicine.

Nurse Profession: RN, MSN, MBA

Episode 5: Politics, Government Affairs, Research Contribution


Contribution:
TNA District 9


Interviews:

Jim Willman

Kristen Johnston
Nurses Day in Washington

Terry Throckmorton, PHD, RN
Research Contributions / State politics

Cindy Zolnierek –TNA President
political influence
Clair Jordon – Early Director of TNA implementing nursing policy
Kevin Stuart –  attorney and lobbyist for passing nursing policies

Terri Newsom
Senior Clinical Research Associate at The Methodist Hospital System


Photo: President John F. Kennedy signing the 1963 Equal Pay Act.
Credit: Public Domain

Politics, Government Affairs, Research Contributions

The photo of President Kennedy signing the 1963 Equal Pay Act (above) is a strong example of how things are accomplished in the U.S.  The same lies true in healthcare.  It takes years of work and consistent political influence to bring about needed change. “Faces of Nursing, Houston” takes a look at the political influences and changes in government affairs affecting Nursing as a profession. This episode uncovers the critical role the Texas Nurses Association's District 9 and other nursing associations have played in shaping the workplace and work life of nurses in this region.

Through the years, policies would be developed through political action and negotiation of nursing curricula. One way to influence political acceptance for changes in care was to provide evaluation reports created through a series of research contributions from medical professionals and nurse daily nursing interactions with patients. Experienced nurses would implement new protocols and/or medications, then monitor and provide the much of the data over a period of time to establish credible evidence. Through their professional and daily engagement with patients, their research contribution has player a tremendous role in political acceptance for a continued improvement in patient care.

Program Objectives:
Provide examples of nursing professionals and associations' role in forming public policy. This episode will also take a look at why the TNA Governmental Affairs Committee, NLAC, and the ANA House of Delegates were created. We will examine how off-hour nurse activities like Nurses’ Day at the Capitol, collaboration with attorneys, and student mentoring in political negotiation all are a significant part of political advocacy in nursing curricula.

Nurse Profession:
Research Contributions Nurse Manager, RN, CCRN


Episode 6: Disasters


Contributions:
UT Health
UTMB


Interviews

Joyce Alt - disaster management
Janet Leatherwood, CNO – organizing nurse David Marshall-CNO UTMB
Pamela Watson-Previous UTMB Dean
recovery teams for community hospital
Include red cross director
Nurses serving during disasters
Students volunteered to recover items for basements


Photo: Hurricane Carla 1958
Credit: Houston Chronicle

Catastrophic/Disasters

With every major catastrophe, whether man made or natural, nurses have played a vital role in caring for those who have been impacted by the brutality of such circumstances.  “Faces of Nursing, Houston” takes a look at major disasters and Nursing's efforts and sacrifices in local gulf related incidents like the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, Hurricane Carla, Tropical Storm Allison, Memorial Day Flood, and Hurricane Harvey recently in 2017.

In the world's fight against infectious diseases, the episode will look at critical points over the course of time.  The tremendous efforts of nurses who were treating Spanish Flu patients in 1918 would serve as a predecessor to the COVID-19 Pandemic one century later where nurses have served as vital caregivers in 2020-2021.   

Program Objectives:
A focal point of this episode is to explore how hospitals, first responders, and the Red Cross engage in an established plan in the aftermath of a disaster or health emergency. The COVID-19 Pandemic brought new challenges never faced before to the entire medical community. Because of the intense stress of caring for a higher volume and higher acuity of patients , many nurses have questioned if they will continue in their profession.  The Pandemic has not only taught nurses new ways of treating patients, but also how to provide family centered care when family members have not been able to be with their loved ones during their hospital stays.  COVID-19 has left a lasting effect on these brave women and men who have put their own lives at risk as nurses along with the lives of their own family members.   

Nurse Profession:
ER and CCRN

Common Theme 1:
Education

A common theme episode is a segment or sub-category of each of the six program episodes. Although this episode equals the time allotted for each program episode, it is divided amongst the six programs and supports the common theme of each program episode.

An episode is divided into six segments over the course of the broadcast.

Contributions:
Prairie View A&M University
UTMB
TWU
St. Thomus
HBU


Interviews:
Patricia Starck – UT
Dr. Betty Adams, Dean Prairie View A&M University College
Beth Anderson – TWU
Poldi Tschirch – Dean, St. Thomas/UTMB


Photo from UTMB Galveston Library. 1904 nurses taking an invalid cooking class .

Education

The history of nursing education is broad and rich as it birthed new opportunities for entering nursing as a profession in the past and launches forward to today’s numerous educational choices.  St. Mary’s Hospital, Galveston, the first Catholic hospital in Texas, was opened as a charity hospital by Bishop Claude M. Dubuis in 1867. At first, the sisters had few patients, but a virulent yellow fever epidemic in 1867 filled both hospitals to overflowing and was the catalyst to find and employ trained nurses.  As a moderately new profession, recruiting nurses were limited, and starting their own school was too costly. It wasn't until a group of prominent local women, including Mrs. John Sealy, formed a “Board of Lady Managers,” and raised funds needed to establish and support the John Sealy Hospital Training School for Nurses in March of 1890 with eighteen students.

The episode will tell of the amazing groundwork early education pioneers have had on this region and the evolution that has led to over 30 different nursing programs in colleges and universities that serve Houston, Galveston and the surrounding region today.

Program Objective:
Historical overview of the development and ever-changing pathway of education programs of nursing to include the first nursing programs, first formal college based nursing programs, and current institutions of learning. The episode will provide an overview of the progression of politics and policies, influences on the nursing schools, colleges and curriculum. Nurses who have worked with or influenced policies in nursing education and continuing education and accreditations.

Nurse Profession: BSN, RN, MSN, MBA

Common Theme 2:
Technology

A common theme episode is a segment or sub-category of each of the six program episodes. Although this episode equals the time allotted for each program episode, it is divided amongst the six programs and supports the common theme of each program episode.

An episode is divided into six segments over the course of the broadcast.

Contributions:
TMC
Technology Medical Records


Interviews:
ICU – Technology Medical Records
Lynn Smith-Cronin – tele-medicine
Joyce Alt – equipment pattens & innovation


Photo from Media Network, Walter Numberg: Early X-Ray Machine

Technology

Technology has had an impact on providing better and more accessible treatment, has improved care and efficiency, and disease control, yet more than likely, it will be a nurse to introduce, advise, or implement that technology in a healthcare setting. This episode displays some of that technology and how it's integrated into patient care.

Technology for inpatient use
Technologies used by patients
Technology

Program Objectives:
Relay when and how new technologies were introduced and who introduced technologies in the Houston/Galveston area like Poldi Tschirch, Trish Richards, James Turley, Pamela Salyer, Linda Harrington, and Constance Johnson. How technology supports nursing activities to be more efficient and how nursing professional played a role in their development.

Nurse Profession:

Common Theme 3:
Texas Medical Center

A common theme episode is a segment or sub-category of each of the six program episodes. Although this episode equals the time allotted for each program episode, it is divided amongst the six programs and supports the common theme of each program episode.

An episode is divided into six segments over the course of the broadcast.

Contribution:
Dean Starck/Dean Frazier at UTHealth Karen Myers; CNO Memorial Hermann

Interviews:
Dean Starck/Dean Frazier at UTHealth Karen Myers; CNO Memorial Hermann
Pat Schwartz, Bubble Boy RN
Jeanette Carneige, cardiothoracic surgery with DR. Cooley
Karlene Kerfoot, LifeFlight RN


Photo by Texas Medical Center Historic Library: 1959 of TMC taken from the Goodyear Blimp

TMC

In the 1950's, The Methodist Hospital, St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital, and Texas Children's Hospital all broke ground and became the catalyst for others to join the community of nonprofit healthcare institutions. From its earliest days TMC has been recognized for many accomplishments. In this episode viewers will be delighted to learn of the nationally recognized people and events that happened here in our community. From new technologies that kept the "Bubble Boy" alive, to new cardiothoracic surgery procedures pioneered by Dr. Cooley, the Texas Medical Center has been a leader through the combined strength of its community. TMC is the home of and the platform for new innovations like the birth of LifeFlight while maintaining a challenging infrastructure to handle the devastation caused during Hurricane Allison 2001 with ensuing flooding of hospitals, libraries and laboratories.

Program Objective:
This episode helps the audience understand the insight and importance of gathering healthcare organizations into a geographic area and how the combined strength provides greater opportunity for all. Highlights TMC successes, hardships, and longevity.


Nurse Professions: CNO, CEO and other RN who worked their way into management roles.

Featuring Interviews With:

Technology Category

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Jacqueline Stout-Aguilar

,
Project Volunteer

Catastrophes/Disasters Category

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Jon Lindgren

,
Executive Producer

Documentary Coordination

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Diversity Research Team

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TMC Research Team

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Shirley M. Morrison PhD, RN

,
Project Volunteer

Community Research Team

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Military Research Team

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Military Research Team

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Sarah Hibbs, MSN, RN

,
Project Volunteer

Community Health Research Team

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Military Research Team

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Education Research Team

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TMC Research Team

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Political Research Team

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Renae R Schumann, PhD

,
Project Volunteer

TMC Research Team

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Education Research Team

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TMC Research Team

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Chelsea Baker, RN, MSN

,
Project Volunteer

TMC Research Team

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Maureen Sain, BSN, RN

,
Project Volunteer

TMC Research Team

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